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Ryan Coogler Reshot The ‘Black Panther’ Ending After Getting Inspiration From ‘The Godfather’

As far as endings go, “Black Panther” has one of the best ever seen in a Marvel Studios film. From the poignant final conversation between Killmonger and T’Challa to the scene in Oakland and at the United Nations, which set the stage for the future, Ryan Coogler’s film just found the perfect way to put a bow on one of the best films of the last year.

Continue reading Ryan Coogler Reshot The ‘Black Panther’ Ending After Getting Inspiration From ‘The Godfather’ at The Playlist.
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Ryan Coogler Retooled ‘Black Panther’ Ending by Cutting Killmonger’s Big Line, Watching the ‘The Godfather’ for Help

Ryan Coogler Retooled ‘Black Panther’ Ending by Cutting Killmonger’s Big Line, Watching the ‘The Godfather’ for Help
In less than a week, “Black Panther” could make history by becoming the first superhero movie to earn an Oscar nomination for Best Picture. The Marvel tentpole has received a major campaign from Disney this awards season, and it has been nominated for numerous prizes from the Golden Globes, Critics’ Choice Awards, and Screen Actors Guild Awards. Co-editor Michael Shawver recently spoke to CinemaBlend about perfecting the movie’s ending and revealed a critical Killmonger line that had to be cut.

The original “Black Panther” ending was the scene in which Chadwick Boseman’s T’Challa addresses the United Nations and announced Wakanda will be opening up its resources for the world. Prior to that scene was Killmonger’s death, which originally culminated in the villain looking out on Wakanda and telling T’Challa, “It’s beautiful, but what are you going to do for everybody in the world who can’t see this?
See full article at Indiewire »

Every Female Director Nominated for an Oscar, From Lina Wertmuller to Greta Gerwig (Photos)

Every Female Director Nominated for an Oscar, From Lina Wertmuller to Greta Gerwig (Photos)
“Lady Bird” writer-director Greta Gerwig becomes only the fifth woman nominated by the Academy in the directing category.

Lina Wertmuller, “Seven Beauties” (1976) • The first woman ever nominated in the category was this Italian director for a drama about an Italian solider who deserted the army during WWII and is sent a German prison camp. She lost to John G. Avildsen for “Rocky.”

Jane Campion, “The Piano” (1993) • The Australian director won an Oscar for her original screenplay for the period drama but lost the directing prize to Steven Spielberg for “Schindler’s List.”

Sofia Coppola, “Lost in Translation” (2003) • The daughter of Oscar-winning “The Godfather” director Francis Ford Coppola picked up her first nomination for the quiet Japan-set character study, but lost to Peter Jackson for “The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King.”

Kathryn Bigelow, “The Hurt Locker” (2009) • Bigelow not only scored a nomination, but managed to defeat her ex-husband James Cameron,
See full article at The Wrap »

Billy Zane Will Play Legendary Actor Marlon Brando in The Film Waltzing With Brando

Billy Zane is set to take on the role of legendary actor Marlon Brando in a new film project called Waltzing With Brando. Zane will also produce the film, which is based on the memoir by the actor’s architect, Bernard Judge.

If you’re not familiar with the memoir, it tells the story of how “Brando plucked Judge, an obscure but idealistic Los Angeles architect from his stable existence and convinced him that he should build the world’s first ecologically perfect retreat on a tiny and uninhabitable Tahitian island.”

The story for the film will be set between 1969 and 1974, “a period during which Brando was preparing to star in The Godfather and Last Tango in Paris. The action will show Brando’s interaction with Judge as they spend time together on the island and work up plans for a paradise getaway far from the public glare at a
See full article at GeekTyrant »

‘The Sopranos’ At 20 Part IV: Real Mobsters, Great Gandolfini & The Most Debated Ending In TV History

  • Deadline
‘The Sopranos’ At 20 Part IV: Real Mobsters, Great Gandolfini & The Most Debated Ending In TV History
The Sopranos’ Oral History, Part IV: When you spend six seasons making a show about an organized crime family that rings true, you’ll inevitably bump up against that criminal element, even if you are tapping history to create fictional storylines. If the mob feels you are celebrating their lawlessness, that is bad. If they believe you are ridiculing them and you piss them off, that might be as bad. Or worse.

Deadline: The Sopranos was filled with movie mob lore, especially around The Godfather. Mario Puzo always said it was fiction. But there is Christopher Moltisanti, trying to impress director Jon Favreau on a

movie set by sharing mob stories breaking down how the Tommy Dorsey contract clash with Frank Sinatra informed the famous scene with the horse head in the bed of the Hollywood mogul. Did you borrow much from actual mob events in writing The Sopranos?

David Chase
See full article at Deadline »

Billy Zane to play Marlon Brando in Waltzing with Brando

Billy Zane is set to produce and star in Waltzing with Brando, an indie drama which will see him taking on the role of screen icon Marlon Brando, Variety has revealed.

The film is being written and directed by Bill Fishman (Posse) from the memoir of Bernard Judge, Brando’s architect. It will take place between 1969 and 1974, a period where Brando was preparing to star in both The Godfather and Last Tango in Paris, and will explore how the actor picked the obscure architect Judge to help him build the world’s first ecologically perfect reteart on a tiny Tahitian island.

Zane is coming off the back of a Best Actor award at the Gold Movie Awards for his role in the romantic drama Lucid and will soon appear in Sky’s street-racing drama series Curfew alongside Sean Bean and Miranda Richardson.

The post Billy Zane to play Marlon Brando
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‘Birds of Passage’ Directors Got Divorced While Shooting — and Still Made a Masterpiece

‘Birds of Passage’ Directors Got Divorced While Shooting — and Still Made a Masterpiece
The 2015 release of “Embrace of the Serpent,” a psychedelic exploration of Colombian tribes in the Amazon, went a lot further than the filmmakers expected. Director Ciro Guerra and his wife, producer Cristina Gallego, traveled from Cannes to Sundance with their acclaimed movie, which ultimately landed a foreign-language Oscar submission. The newfound attention and modest commercial success enabled them to make a longtime passion project, “Birds of Passage.” That movie uncovers the roots of Colombia’s drug war in the rise of illegal trading within the remote Wayyu tribes, which were emboldened — and then nearly destroyed — by criminal enterprises across several decades.

The project took years of research, as well as delicate maneuvers to gain the approval of the Wayyu community, members of which comprised 30 percent of the production. Gallego took on co-directing duties with her husband for the first time, juggling long days that required tricky on-location shoots in rugged
See full article at Indiewire »

Billy Zane to Play Marlon Brando in Indie Movie ‘Waltzing With Brando’

Billy Zane to Play Marlon Brando in Indie Movie ‘Waltzing With Brando’
Marlon Brando is undoubtedly one of the greatest actors of all time, while Billy Zane is, um, not. Nevertheless, the Titanic villain has signed on to play The Godfather star in the indie movie Waltzing With Brando, which Zane will also produce. Bill Fishman is writing and directing the film, which is based on a memoir by Bernard Judge, a Los Angeles-based architect whom Brando hired to build the world's first ecologically perfect retreat on a tiny and uninhabitable Tahitian island. The story will largely take place between 1969 and 1974, when Brando and Judge spent time on …
See full article at Collider.com »

Billy Zane to Play Marlon Brando in Indie Movie ‘Waltzing With Brando’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Billy Zane to Play Marlon Brando in Indie Movie ‘Waltzing With Brando’ (Exclusive)
Billy Zane will produce and take the lead role in “Waltzing With Brando,” playing Marlon Brando in a film based on a memoir by the iconic actor’s architect, Bernard Judge.

The memoir tells the story of how Brando plucked Judge, an obscure but idealistic Los Angeles architect from his stable existence and convinced him that he should build the world’s first ecologically perfect retreat on a tiny and uninhabitable Tahitian island.

Bill Fishman will write and direct the movie. Additional casting is underway, notably for the role of Judge. The project reunites Fishman and Zane after they worked together on the 1993 Western “Posse.”

The film will be set primarily between 1969 and 1974, a period during which Brando was preparing to star in “The Godfather” and “Last Tango in Paris.” The action will show Brando’s interaction with Judge as they spend time together on the island and work up
See full article at Variety »

Al Pacino Near Deal to Star in Drama Series ‘The Hunt’ at Amazon

  • Variety
Al Pacino Near Deal to Star in Drama Series ‘The Hunt’ at Amazon
Al Pacino is close to closing a deal to star in the upcoming drama series “The Hunt” at Amazon, Variety has confirmed with sources.

Should the deal close, it would mark Pacino’s first regular television role in his long and storied career. Amazon declined to comment.

Pacino has previously starred in the TV miniseries “Angels in America” and “The Godfather Saga.” He is known for his roles in iconic films like “The Godfather” franchise, “Serpico,” “Dog Day Afternoon,” and “Scent of a Woman.” In recent years, he has also starred in a number of HBO films like “You Don’t Know Jack” as Jack Kevorkian, “Phil Spector,” and “Paterno.”

He is repped by CAA.

The Hunt” follows a diverse band of Nazi Hunters living in 1977 New York City. They have discovered that hundreds of high ranking Nazi officials are living among us and conspiring to create a Fourth Reich in the Us.
See full article at Variety »

Cinematographers Share Their List of the 100 Best Shot Films of the 20th Century

In celebration of its 100th anniversary, the American Society of Cinematographers has released a list of the 100 best shot films of the 20th century.

This list was released to "showcase the best of cinematography as selected by professional cinematographers.” Here's how the list was put together:

The process of cultivating the 100 films began with Asc members each submitting 10 to 25 titles that were personally inspirational or perhaps changed the way they approached their craft. “I asked them — as cinematographers, members of the Asc, artists, filmmakers and people who love film and whose lives were shaped by films — to list the films that were most influential,” Fierberg explains. A master list was then complied, and members voted on what they considered to be the most essential 100 titles.

Here's a little sizzle reel that was cut together showcasing some of the films on the list:

It's hard to argue with the Top 10 films,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The 100 Greatest Achievements in Cinematography in the 20th Century, According to Asc

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) this year, they’ve polled their members to determine 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century. Topping the list is David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia, shot by Freddie Young. Also in the top ten is Blade Runner (Jordan Cronenweth), The Conformist (Vittorio Storaro), Days of Heaven (Néstor Almendros), and more.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, he said “Asc members wanted to call attention to the most significant achievements of the cinematographer’s art but not refer to one achievement as ‘better’ than another. The selected films represent a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to Asc members and have exhibited enduring influence on generations of filmmakers.”

See the top 10 below, along with the full list.

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Freddie Young,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Happy New Year, Colin Burstead’ Review

Stars: Neil Maskell, Sura Dohnke, Marvin Maskell, Nicole Nettleingham, Doon Mackichan, Bill Paterson, Hayley Squires, Mark Monero, Richard Glover, Sudha Bhuchar, Vincent Ebrahim, Sinead Matthews, Sarah Baxendale, Charles Dance, Joe Cole, Peter Ferdinando | Written and Directed by Ben Wheatley

Happy New Year, Colin Burstead follows in the stead of Ben Wheatley’s previous directing efforts, in particular his 2013 black and white acid trip exploit A Field in England, in the case of releasing his picture simultaneously on both demand and a limited cinematic release. However this may alos just be his unsung masterpiece in a filmography that continues to evoke a grand sense of evolution with each entry and distinctive palette, which reinforces Wheatley’s stunning artistic ability with every and any angle.

Wheatley’s latest is a somewhat ironic variation of his first cinematic feature in Down Terrace and his breakout action hit of 2016, Free Fire - with the
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

2019 Directors Guild of America Awards winner will become Oscar frontrunner

On Tuesday (Jan. 8), the Directors Guild of America announced the nominees for the 71st annual edition of its awards. The five contenders are: Bradley Cooper (“A Star is Born”), Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”), Peter Farrelly (“Green Book”), Spike Lee (“BlacKkKlansman”) and Adam McKay (“Vice”).

Cuaron won Best Director from both the guild and the academy five years ago for “Gravity.” He was one of the 61 DGA champs to repeat at the Oscars since the guild aligned itself with the academy calendar in 1950.

He looks all but certain to win both awards again this year. Cuaron has been the frontrunner all season long. He won the Golden Globe on Sunday. Of the 20 regional critics groups to weigh in with their picks of the best of the year, he has dominated with a lucky 13 wins. The only other DGA nominee with multiple wins is Lee with three.

While the DGA is aces at forecasting the eventual Oscar winner,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Tops Asc’s List of 100 20th Century Cinematography Milestones

  • Variety
The American Society of Cinematographers, in celebration of the organization’s 100th anniversary, has revealed its list of 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography from the 20th century. The list culminates with a top 10, topped by Freddie Young’s lensing of David Lean’s Oscar-winning 1962 epic “Lawrence of Arabia.”

Jordan Cronenweth’s work on Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi standard “Blade Runner” came in at number two. Celebrated cinematographer Roger Deakins finally won an Oscar last year for the film’s sequel, “Blade Runner 2049.”

Vittorio Storaro rounded out the top three for Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 Vietnam odyssey “Apocalypse Now.” He, Conrad Hall and Gordon Willis each appeared on the overall list five times, leading the pack. John Alcott, Caleb Deschanel and Haskell Wexler each lensed four.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, Asc (“The Affair”) and voted on by Asc members, the milestones list is the first of
See full article at Variety »

Asc Cinematographers Celebrate 100th Anniversary With List Of Best Shot Films Of All Time – See Who They Chose As #1

  • Deadline
The American Society of Cinematographers (Asc), an elite organization of cinematographers at the top of their field, is celebrating the 100th anniversary of its founding today. What better way to honor that milestone than to create a list of 100 milestone films known for the art and craft of cinematography in the 20th century, and they call it the Best Shot Films Of All Time.

Asc says this is the first time a list like this has been compiled, at least by a group of pros who should know what they are talking about. The list culminates in a Top 10 (the other 90 are unranked). The Top 10 Best Shot Films Of All Time are:

Lawrence of Arabia (1962), shot by Freddie Young, Bsc (Dir. David Lean) Blade Runner (1982), shot by Jordan Cronenweth, Asc (Dir. Ridley Scott) Apocalypse Now (1979), shot by Vittorio Storaro, Asc, Aic (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola) Citizen Kane (1941), shot by Gregg Toland,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Tops Asc List of 10 Best-Shot Films of the 20th Century

The American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) celebrates its 100th anniversary on Tuesday by unveiling two lists devoted to 20th century visual achievements: the 100 Milestone Films and the top 10 Best-Shot Films, led by “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962), shot by Oscar-winning cinematographer Freddie Young.

The rest of the Top 10 list includes sci-fi classics “2001: A Space Odyssey” (1968), shot by Geoffrey Unsworth, and “Blade Runner” (1982), shot by Jordan Cronenweth; two from director Francis Ford Coppola: “The Godfather” (1972), shot by Gordon Willis, and “Apocalypse Now” (1979), shot by Oscar-winner Vittorio Storaro; two black-and-white entries: “Citizen Kane” (1941), shot by Gregg Toland, and “Raging Bull” (1980), shot by Michael Chapman; “Days of Heaven” (1978), shot by Oscar winner Néstor Almendros; and “The French Connection” (1971), shot by five-time Oscar nominee Owen Roizman.

Alas, there are no silent movies in the top 10. And there’s no representation of the ’30s; ‘the ’50s; or the ’90s.

The lists were voted on by
See full article at Indiewire »

The trailer for FX’s steamy ‘Fosse/Verdon’ packs all that jazz and showbiz pizzazz

For someone who has done a fair share of jazz hands in my youth as a dance student, the most exciting moment of the slog that was the 76th edition of the Golden Globes wasn’t during the ceremony. It was the teaser trailer for FX’s limited series“Fosse/Verdon,” with Academy Award winner Sam Rockwell as choreographer and filmmaker Bob Fosse and Michelle Williams as his wife, muse and Broadway sensation Gwen Verdon. Lin-Manuel Miranda is an executive producer. Also involved is the couple’s daughter, Nicole Fosse, who is a co-executive producer and oversaw the project, including the use of her father’s original choreography.

If you have ever seen 1979’s nine-time Oscar nominated “All That Jazz,” the autobiographical film directed by Fosse and starring Roy Scheider, the clip above has a similar feel of sophistication, sensuality and snap — as it should. I would never guess that Rockwell,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Nicolas Cage movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Leaving Las Vegas,’ ‘Raising Arizona,’ ‘National Treasure’

  • Gold Derby
Nicolas Cage movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Leaving Las Vegas,’ ‘Raising Arizona,’ ‘National Treasure’
Nicolas Cage comes from one of film’s most esteemed families. His uncle is Francis Ford Coppola (“The Godfather”) and his aunt is actress Talia Shire. Not wanting to appear like his career was the productive of nepotism, when he started acting he took the name Cage from one of his favorite comic book characters, Marvel’s Luke Cage.

Cage’s film career started off quite auspiciously with a small role in the popular comedy “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” when he was just 18 years old. He followed that up with a lead role in the cult classic “Valley Girl.” Both films interestingly dealt with the life of teenagers in the Los Angeles suburbs of the San Fernando Valley.

SEEOscar Best Picture Gallery: History of Every Academy Award-Winning Movie

For his third film Cage would finally agree to work with his uncle when he appeared in Coppola’s “Rumble Fish,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Nicolas Cage movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Nicolas Cage movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Nicolas Cage comes from one of film’s most esteemed families. His uncle is Francis Ford Coppola (“The Godfather”) and his aunt is actress Talia Shire. Not wanting to appear like his career was the productive of nepotism, when he started acting he took the name Cage from one of his favorite comic book characters, Marvel’s Luke Cage.

Cage’s film career started off quite auspiciously with a small role in the popular comedy “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” when he was just 18 years old. He followed that up with a lead role in the cult classic “Valley Girl.” Both films interestingly dealt with the life of teenagers in the Los Angeles suburbs of the San Fernando Valley.

For his third film Cage would finally agree to work with his uncle when he appeared in Coppola’s “Rumble Fish,” followed the following year by Coppola’s “The Cotton Club.
See full article at Gold Derby »
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