Cinematographers Share Their List of the 100 Best Shot Films of the 20th Century

In celebration of its 100th anniversary, the American Society of Cinematographers has released a list of the 100 best shot films of the 20th century.

This list was released to "showcase the best of cinematography as selected by professional cinematographers.” Here's how the list was put together:

The process of cultivating the 100 films began with Asc members each submitting 10 to 25 titles that were personally inspirational or perhaps changed the way they approached their craft. “I asked them — as cinematographers, members of the Asc, artists, filmmakers and people who love film and whose lives were shaped by films — to list the films that were most influential,” Fierberg explains. A master list was then complied, and members voted on what they considered to be the most essential 100 titles.

Here's a little sizzle reel that was cut together showcasing some of the films on the list:

It's hard to argue with the Top 10 films,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The 100 Greatest Achievements in Cinematography in the 20th Century, According to Asc

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) this year, they’ve polled their members to determine 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century. Topping the list is David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia, shot by Freddie Young. Also in the top ten is Blade Runner (Jordan Cronenweth), The Conformist (Vittorio Storaro), Days of Heaven (Néstor Almendros), and more.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, he said “Asc members wanted to call attention to the most significant achievements of the cinematographer’s art but not refer to one achievement as ‘better’ than another. The selected films represent a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to Asc members and have exhibited enduring influence on generations of filmmakers.”

See the top 10 below, along with the full list.

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Freddie Young,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Tops Asc’s List of 100 20th Century Cinematography Milestones

  • Variety
The American Society of Cinematographers, in celebration of the organization’s 100th anniversary, has revealed its list of 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography from the 20th century. The list culminates with a top 10, topped by Freddie Young’s lensing of David Lean’s Oscar-winning 1962 epic “Lawrence of Arabia.”

Jordan Cronenweth’s work on Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi standard “Blade Runner” came in at number two. Celebrated cinematographer Roger Deakins finally won an Oscar last year for the film’s sequel, “Blade Runner 2049.”

Vittorio Storaro rounded out the top three for Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 Vietnam odyssey “Apocalypse Now.” He, Conrad Hall and Gordon Willis each appeared on the overall list five times, leading the pack. John Alcott, Caleb Deschanel and Haskell Wexler each lensed four.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, Asc (“The Affair”) and voted on by Asc members, the milestones list is the first of
See full article at Variety »

Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the early 1940s, including ‘White Christmas’ and ‘You’ll Never Know’

Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the early 1940s, including ‘White Christmas’ and ‘You’ll Never Know’
This article marks Part 3 of the Gold Derby series analyzing 84 years of Best Original Song at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at the timeless tunes recognized in this category, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the Academy Awards winners.

The 1941 Oscar nominees in Best Original Song were:

“Out of the Silence” from “All-American Co-Ed”

“Blues in the Night” from “Blues in the Night

“Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company” from “Buck Privates

“Baby Mine” from “Dumbo

The Last Time I Saw Paris” from “Lady Be Good”

Dolores” from “Las Vegas Nights”

“Be Honest with Me” from “Ridin’ on a Rainbow”

“Chattanooga Choo Choo” from “Sun Valley Serenade

“Since I Kissed My Baby Goodbye” from “You’ll Never Get Rich”

Won: “The Last Time I Saw Paris” from “Lady Be Good”

Should’ve won: “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B” from “Buck Privates
See full article at Gold Derby »

Fox Celebrates ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ and ‘Alita: Battle Angel’ While Striking a Sad Farewell at CinemaCon 2018

Fox motion picture chairman Stacey Snider’s CinemaCon gave a moving eulogy for her transitioning studio; she made a similar case for the power of movies to bring people together with shared humanity. The Fox fanfare and reel of the great films from the studio over 85 years brought tears to more than one in Caesar’s Colosseum.

While the studio’s highlight reel ranged from “Gentlemen’s Agreement,” and “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” to “Fight Club” and “Avatar,” a line from John Ford’s “How Green Was My Valley” resonated: “Something is going out of this valley that will never be replaced.” It felt like a wake. What will happen? Nobody knows, but it won’t be the same. And Snider, who choked up as the Fox fanfare played, may not be able to finish what she started.

She reminded the audience that “The Greatest Showman” is still in theaters in its 18th week.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Fox Celebrates ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ and ‘Alita: Battle Angel’ While Striking a Sad Farewell at CinemaCon 2018

Fox motion picture chairman Stacey Snider’s CinemaCon gave a moving eulogy for her transitioning studio; she made a similar case for the power of movies to bring people together with shared humanity. The Fox fanfare and reel of the great films from the studio over 85 years brought tears to more than one in Caesar’s Colosseum.

While the studio’s highlight reel ranged from “Gentlemen’s Agreement,” and “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” to “Fight Club” and “Avatar,” a line from John Ford’s “How Green Was My Valley” resonated: “Something is going out of this valley that will never be replaced.” It felt like a wake. What will happen? Nobody knows, but it won’t be the same. And Snider, who choked up as the Fox fanfare played, may not be able to finish what she started.

She reminded the audience that “The Greatest Showman” is still in theaters in its 18th week.
See full article at Indiewire »

20th Century Fox Gets Emotional In Powerful Show As Much About Its Past As It Was About The Future – CinemaCon

  • Deadline
Did CinemaCon save the best for (nearly) the last? In terms of the movies on display we’ll have to wait and see, but in terms of pure emotion I would have to guess there wasn’t a dry eye in Caesars Palace’s Colosseum at this morning’s richly nostalgic, proud and perhaps bittersweet presentation from 20th Century Fox that could — if and when the proposed Disney merger is approved — be the last the iconic studio ever does on of these on its own here as one of Hollywood’s storied six majors.

Afterwards in the lobby, it was hard to find a Fox staffer without tears still in their eyes. Yes, there was the usual slate tubthumping, and a few star and filmmaker appearances (though much lighter compared to what the other studios sans Disney have done here in that regard), but this presentation brilliantly masterminded by Fox
See full article at Deadline »

Every Best Director winner in Oscars history: Welcome to the club, Guillermo del Toro (‘The Shape of Water’)

Every Best Director winner in Oscars history: Welcome to the club, Guillermo del Toro (‘The Shape of Water’)
On the 90th anniversary of the Oscars, Guillermo del Toro was finally welcomed into the Best Director club when he prevailed for his fantasy film “The Shape of Water.” Earlier this awards season del Toro told us that “The Shape of Water” was a “fairy tale for troubled times,” a reference to the movie’s heroine (Sally Hawkins) being a mute woman who falls in love with a sea creature. Besides winning Best Director, del Toro also accepted the prize for Best Picture as one of the film’s producers. Click through our photo gallery above to see our updated Best Director gallery featuring all 90 winners in order.

See 2018 Oscars: Complete list of winners (and losers)

Guillermo del Toro joins a list of former Best Director winners that notably includes his fellow Mexican director friends Alejandro G. Inarritu and Alfonso Cuaron. These three amigos have now won four of the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars so Right: how the Academy Awards became relevant again

After Moonlight swept the 2017 Oscars, could this year’s awards be the most socially conscious and boundary pushing yet?

.Entertainment awards shows: what are they, but a celebrity party to which the likes of you and me are never invited? The relationship between award-winners and cultural excellence has always been coincidental, at best. How else to explain why How Green Was My Valley, not Citizen Kane, won the 1942 Oscar? How the Emmys managed to completely overlook The Wire for five whole seasons? Or the fact that, in 2014, Macklemore beat Kendrick Lamar to the best rap album Grammy?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscar Best Director gallery: All 89 winners from Damien Chazelle to Frank Borzage & Lewis Milestone

Oscar Best Director gallery: All 89 winners from Damien Chazelle to Frank Borzage & Lewis Milestone
All five of this year’s nominees for Best Director are looking for their first Oscar win. The lucky recipient will join the illustrious list of 69 filmmakers that have won in this category since the first Oscars were handed out in May of 1929. We have compiled the definitive gallery of every Best Director winner in the 89-year history of the Academy Awards, from the first year — which had two recipients — to reigning champ Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”). Click through our detailed Best Director photo gallery above.

At the inaugural Oscar ceremony, two directors were honored– one for comedy (Lewis Milestone for “Two Arabian Nights”) and one for drama (Frank Borzage for “7th Heaven”); the practice was discontinued after the first year. On four occasions, a single director has scored multiple nominations in a single year, the most recent being Steven Soderbergh, who earned noms in 2000 for “Erin Brockovich” and “Traffic,
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Camera Moves #8

  • MUBI
“Strange that the mind will forget so much of what only this moment is passed, and yet hold clear and bright the memory of what happened years ago, of men and women long since dead…Can I believe my friends all gone when their voices are still a glory in my ears? No. And I will stand to say no again, for they remain a living truth within my mind.”—Huw Morgan, How Green Was My Valley Memory is a singular fascination for Terence Davies. His films are structured not around a traditional narrative, but the seemingly inane trivialities that stick out in a person’s recollection of their lives. They are punctuated not by rousing speeches or any obvious character development, but by things like a lesson on different kinds of erosion, an uneasy moment of sexual guilt in church and a quote from a film. Perhaps the most
See full article at MUBI »

Blu-ray Review – Castle in the Sky (1986)

Castle in the Sky, 1986.

Written and Directed by Hayao Miyazaki.

Featuring the voice talents of Anna Paquin, James Van Der Beek, Cloris Leachman, Mark Hamill

Synopsis:

GKids has secured the new home video distributor contract for Studio Ghibli films, and they’ve released a big batch of them on Blu-ray, with more bonus features than what was found on the earlier Blu discs. Here we take a look at Castle in the Sky, which was Studio Ghibli’s first release in 1986.

If you’re thinking about starting your own film studio, you couldn’t do much worse than releasing something like Castle in the Sky as your debut effort. It was released in 1986 as Hayao Miyazaki’s first movie through his newly-founded Studio Ghibli, and more than three decades later, it still holds up.

Castle in the Sky is a rip-roaring adventure film that can hold its own with the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Wonderstruck' Director Todd Haynes on Reuniting With Julianne Moore and Working With Child Actors (Exclusive)

'Wonderstruck' Director Todd Haynes on Reuniting With Julianne Moore and Working With Child Actors (Exclusive)
Todd Haynes relaxes into a couch in a suite at the Beverly Hills Four Seasons, having arrived at his final sit down at the end of a long press day for his new film, Wonderstruck, which tells the interlacing stories of two children across different time periods: In 1977, Ben (played by Pete's Dragon actor Oakes Fegley) goes on a quest through New York City to find the father he never knew, while in 1927, Rose (newcomer Millicent Simmonds), a young, deaf cinephile, likewise sets out into the city in search of silent movie star Lillian Mayhew (Julianne Moore). The movie marks the director's fourth collaboration with Moore, following 1995's Safe, 2002's Far From Heaven (which he was Oscar-nominated for Best Original Screenplay and she for Best Actress) and 2007's I'm Not There.

Considering Wonderstruck had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in May, followed by a run of the festival gauntlet with screenings at Telluride, BFI London and as
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Florida Project,” which has just started its platform release across the country, what is the greatest child performance in a film?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian, Vanity Fair

I can agonize over this question or I can go at this Malcolm Gladwell “Blink”-style. My answer is Tatum O’Neal in “Paper Moon.” She’s just so funny and tough, which of course makes the performance all the more heartbreaking. She won the freaking Oscar at age 10 for this and I’d really love to give a more deep cut response, but why screw around? Paper Moon is a perfect film and she is the lynchpin.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Furniture Index

Can we have a random break for applause for Daniel Walber's The Furniture column. It was Daniel's birthday this weekend so he has the day off. He's already 69 episodes in to this incredible series which has been filled with sharp insights, a keen eye, and rich Hollywood anecdotes. Here's everything he's covered thus far. Please show your love in the comments if you look forward to these each Monday.

The Forties and Fifties

Hold Back the Dawn (1941) Bored at the border

How Green Was My Valley (1941) Designing dignity

That Hamilton Woman (1941) High ceilings

• Captain of the Clouds (1942) A Canadian air show

• The Magnificent Andersons (1942) Victorian Palace / Manifest Destiny

My Gal Sal (1942) Nonsense Gay Nineties

The Shanghai Gesture (1942) Appropriating Chinese design

Black Narcissus (1947) Mad for matte paintings

David and Bathsheba (1951) A humble palace of moral struggle

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Decorative madness

My Cousin Rachel (1952) Ghosts of property

Lust for Life
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ten Legendary Filmmakers Who Have Never Won A Best Director Oscar

The Academy Award, the pinnacle of success in all fields of filmmaking – but you would be surprised at how many famous, and indeed legendary filmmakers there are who have never won an Oscar. Yes, like Leonardo DiCaprio, who, up until 2016 had never received a golden statue (he eventually won for The Revenant after multiple nominatons), these directing legends have not managed to take home the ultimate prize during their careers.

Stanley Kubrick

Despite being a screen filmmaking legend, and being nominated for the likes of Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, and Barry Lyndon, Stanley Kubrick never did strike it rich in terms of bagging an Oscar in a career that spanned five decades. He did win an Oscar for special effects though, for the superb 2001: A Space Odyssey all of the way back in 1968. But why didn’t he bag the big one?

Orson Welles
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Oscar Political Moments: A Timeline of the Memorable Sacrifices, Protests, and Speeches Throughout The Telecast’s History

Oscar Political Moments: A Timeline of the Memorable Sacrifices, Protests, and Speeches Throughout The Telecast’s History
Filmmakers and stars have often taken a political stance by choosing which projects to make. But when the Academy Awards ceremony began in 1929 to honor the best in film, this created a more public way to demonstrate opinions about the state of the world, the government or a cause.

Read More: Meryl Streep Fires Back at Donald Trump in Blistering Speech: ‘We Have the Right to Live Our Lives’

Not everyone has taken this opportunity though, except for maybe wearing the odd ribbon to support awareness or using their attendance (or lack thereof) to show solidarity. Those blessed by winning a coveted statuette, however, can use their actual acceptance speech as a platform to speak out. Although the awards started being televised in 1953, it took until the 1970s until winners began to really take advantage of having a massive audience for their views. And at times, even the Academy itself got political.
See full article at Indiewire »

9 Oscars Winners Who Don't Hold Up to the Test of Time

9 Oscars Winners Who Don't Hold Up to the Test of Time
Just because a movie or a celebrity wins an Oscar, that doesn't mean the win was deserved. While the Academy Awards are seen as the capstone to awards season -- and one of the highest honors in the business -- we all know that stars and movies get snubbed or overlooked all the time.

What's worse is when we look back at what did win, and shake our heads in confusion and disbelief. So, with the 89th Academy Awards just around the corner, let's take a look back over the show's illustrious history at a few times the Academy voters clearly made a mistake.

Watch: 2017 Oscar Awards Nominees: 'La La Land' Leads With 14 Nominations

1. How Green Was My Valley wins Best Picture at the 14th Academy Awards in 1942

20th Century Fox

Beat Out: Citizen Kane, The Maltese Falcon, Blossoms in the Dust, Here Comes Mr. Jordan, Hold Back the Dawn, The Little Foxes, [link
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

My favorite best picture Oscar winner: Midnight Cowboy

Continuing a series of Guardian writers’ all-time Academy picks, Gwilym Mumford explains why the 1970 winner remains a vital and progressive triumph

The Oscars best picture category has a long and ignoble history of favouring the inoffensive over the revolutionary – Citizen Kane lost out to How Green Was My Valley. Forrest Gump defeated Pulp Fiction. The Third Man, 2001: A Space Odyssey and Do The Right Thing failed to even be nominated for best picture. (It’s a cruel world when Crash can win the thing and that lot can’t even get a look in). As a rule, the Academy tends to be behind the times – #OscarsSoWhite is recent evidence of that.

All of which makes the decision to crown Midnight Cowboy best picture in 1970 seem, in retrospect, like such a welcome aberration. It was a rare moment when Hollywood saw the coming changes in cinema and, rather than ignore
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »
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