4.8/10
63
5 user 1 critic

Her Painted Hero (1915)

A stage-struck young woman becomes an heiress, and hopes to use her new-found wealth to fulfill a fantasy.

Director:

F. Richard Jones

Writer:

Mack Sennett (scenario)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Hale Hamilton ... A Matinee Idol
Charles Murray ... A Property Man
Slim Summerville ... A Bill Poster
Polly Moran ... A Stage-Struck Maiden
Harry Booker Harry Booker ... The Maiden's Father
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Storyline

Ah the pleasures of vaudeville...or at least vaudeville veteran and great Hal Hamilton's performance as the throughly untalented vaudeville thespian makes this little known Keystone Cops two-reel film somewhat of a departure, in that it is deliberately poking fun at their own profession. Hamilton is the leader of an equally untalented vaudeville troupe. When the Keystone Cops get involved, the funnies roll out. Written by SindyMac

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Genres:

Comedy | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 November 1915 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Keystone Film Company See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Rough-Edged, But Sometimes Very Funny
9 February 2006 | by Snow LeopardSee all my reviews

This Keystone comedy has their characteristic rough-edged, free-wheeling style, with some of the details left unattended to, but at times it is very funny, and all of it is watchable. It has good energy, and it picks up as it goes along, with the most enjoyable parts coming later on.

The story has Polly Moran as a stage-struck young woman who learns that she stands to inherit a large fortune. This suddenly earns her plenty of attention from hopeful suitors, while she herself still longs for the stage matinée idol whom she worships. It's the kind of simple setup that often works pretty well as a two-reel comedy. The rest of the cast includes Hale Hamilton and Slim Summerville.

The action in the first few scenes is not always carefully done, and it's almost necessary to watch it a second time to see just how it all fits together. Also, as an earlier commentator here has accurately pointed out, at least two of the characters become hard to distinguish from one another, especially since they spend much of the movie racing around.

But the movie makes up for the weaknesses with its spirited slapstick, especially in the climactic sequence. Its depiction of a low-quality stage production is very amusing, and it has enough material in it to have filled up two or three times as much running time. This part is well worth seeing again, to be able to catch all of the gag ideas. Overall, it's not a real classic or anything, but it's worth seeing for fans of silent slapstick comedy.


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