Indie News

Shadows Under Strain: Dp Lol Crawley and the Cipher of Vox Lux

When it comes time to “punish” the image of a film, say with filtration, grease (generously applied to the front of the lens), or underexposure, cinematographers regress from their dear and safe technical jargon and assume the barbarous dialect of medieval executioners. They don’t just underexpose their picture to see how it reacts under strain, they “suffocate” it, “break” it, and “destroy” it — sometimes in spite of itself. The digital image is nary embraced and mostly worked against, its sterile lines deliberately corroded and beaten to a duller moosh. Cinematographer Lol Crawley Bsc tortures the film […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Shadows Under Strain: Dp Lol Crawley and the Cipher of Vox Lux

When it comes time to “punish” the image of a film, say with filtration, grease (generously applied to the front of the lens), or underexposure, cinematographers regress from their dear and safe technical jargon and assume the barbarous dialect of medieval executioners. They don’t just underexpose their picture to see how it reacts under strain, they “suffocate” it, “break” it, and “destroy” it — sometimes in spite of itself. The digital image is nary embraced and mostly worked against, its sterile lines deliberately corroded and beaten to a duller moosh. Cinematographer Lol Crawley Bsc tortures the film […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Moody Blues: Music from the Films of Bertrand Bonello

Would you believe me if I told you that one of the most transcendent moments in contemporary cinema is soundtracked by the Moody Blues? Nothing against the English arena rock stalwarts, who last year were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but even in the late 1960s, at the absolute height of their powers as progenitors of an eternally (and proudly) unfashionable progressive rock sound, the Moody Blues were anything but cool. Which is to say, then as now, they’re not exactly the first band you’d expect to hear in a movie, let alone a French movie set in an early 20th century brothel. Director Bertrand Bonello used the Moody Blues to spectacular effect in his 2011 masterpiece House of Tolerance, a feverish evocation of fin de siècle Paris in which period perfect detail and flagrant artifice collide in a of slipstream of pre- and postmodern aesthetics.
See full article at MUBI »

Video Essay. Anaphora: Martin Scorsese's "The Color of Money"

Anaphora is an on-going series of video essays exploring the neglected films by major directors.It's always stunning to look back on film history and see who was in need of a comeback and why. Martin Scorsese's influence, his style as a filmmaker and his service to film preservation and history, is taken for granted today. In the late 70s and early 80s every stop light was red. New York, New York was a huge comedown after Taxi Driver, Raging Bull was a modest success at best, The King of Comedy bombed, After Hours made its budget back and then vanished, and Last Temptation of Christ was mired in controversy that hurt its box office. In the middle of all this was The Color of Money, probably the last thing anyone expected him to make: A sequel to Robert Rossen's The Hustler starring original lead Paul Newman and
See full article at MUBI »

‘True Detective’ Review: Episode 3 Shows Why Relationships Matter More Than the Case

‘True Detective’ Review: Episode 3 Shows Why Relationships Matter More Than the Case
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “True Detective” Season 3, Episode 3, “The Big Never.”]

Hoo boy, a whole lot happened in “True Detective” this week! Turns out the Purcell kids didn’t go over to Ronnie’s house as many times as they say they did — so who were they seeing? The evidence in William’s recovered backpack points to an adult — who else would buy all those toys for him? How does the communion photo figure into all this, given Will’s body was left in a similar, praying pose after his death? And what about the dice, the bloody rocks, and the house near the suspected murder site? Speaking of the woods, what did Wayne (Mahershala Ali) leave in the woods? Amelia’s ghost seems to think he’s covering something up, so it’s not just the aging detective’s deteriorating memory that’s holding up the investigation. Plus, now there’s a mysterious
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Smilf’ Does ‘Atlanta’s’ Social Surrealism For Struggling Single Moms With Similar Shimmering Brilliance [Season 2 Review]

Someone should coin a specific term for the unusual mélange of magical realism, biting social-commentary and the surreal existential absurdism of “Atlanta,” if only so I can reapply said term to Showtime‘s fierce and funny “Smilf,” a series that came to similar ideas on its own, but filtered through an unapologetically raw feminist lens of struggle, heartbreak and hilarity. Season one already featured these disparate, idiosyncratic elements, brilliantly fusing them with painfully sharp observations and deep wells of empathy.

Continue reading ‘Smilf’ Does ‘Atlanta’s’ Social Surrealism For Struggling Single Moms With Similar Shimmering Brilliance [Season 2 Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Andy Gruenberg, Longtime Film Distribution Executive, Dies at 68

Andy Gruenberg, a longtime film-distribution executive who most recently oversaw theatrical distribution for Netflix, died suddenly on January 18. He was 68.

Born in St. Paul, Minnesota on March 10, 1950, Gruenberg spent his childhood in Milwaukee and his working life in the film industry; his tenure included stints at Warner Bros., Columbia, MGM, and Miramax, where he helped bring everything from “Ghostbusters” and “The Karate Kid” to “Leaving Las Vegas” and “Life Is Beautiful” to theaters. Gruenberg was Miramax’s President of Distribution when “Shakespeare in Love” won Best Picture and Executive Vice President of Distribution at MGM when “Leaving Las Vegas” won Nicolas Cage the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Other titles whose theatrical releases he oversaw include “Get Shorty,” “Tomorrow Never Dies,” “The Proposition,” and “Bernie.”

“I loved working with Andy and enjoyed our friendship over many years,” said Ted Mundorff, who co-founded the Film Arcade with him in 2011. “Andy was
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Glass’ Tops the Box Office, But Fails to Shatter the Mlk Weekend

‘Glass’ Tops the Box Office, But Fails to Shatter the Mlk Weekend
M. Night Shyamalan’s “Glass,” completing a loose trilogy preceded by “Unbreakable” and “Split,” easily topped the first three days of the Martin Luther King holiday weekend. Its $40.5 million total nearly beat the totals for the next three films combined.

However, grosses overall continue to decline when put beside comparable periods last year. Though the full figures should slightly outpace those of the 2018 calendar weekend, they will be down 30 percent from the earlier Mlk holiday. Year to date numbers are down 13 percent.

“Glass” has the huge financial plus of costing only about $20 million. That is double the expense for the 2016 film, which opened at the same number two years ago, through the post-mlk weekend. Its success, and advance expectations for this (as well as the decline in total releases from major studios) meant it had no competition among new wide releases.

That’s unheard of. All recent years have seen
See full article at Indiewire »

Ja Rule Slams Netflix and Hulu for Fyre Festival Documentaries: ‘I Too Was Hustled’

Ja Rule Slams Netflix and Hulu for Fyre Festival Documentaries: ‘I Too Was Hustled’
Ja Rule isn’t a fan of the two Fyre Festival documentaries that dropped this week — or the streaming platforms responsible for them. The rapper and would-be music-festival organizer, whose portrayal in both Hulu’s “Fyre Fraud” and Netflix’s “Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened” isn’t especially favorable, took to Twitter to share his feelings about the films and viewers’ reactions to them: “I love how ppl watch a doc and think they have all the answers…,” Ja tweeted, presumably employing sarcasm to indicate that he does not, in fact, love this phenomenon.

“I had an amazing vision to create a festival like No Other!!! I would Never Scam or Fraud anyone what sense does that make???” he then asked rhetorically. Fyre Festival was promoted as an exclusive luxury experience but ended up turning into a disaster, with no performances ever taking place and attendees left to
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Roma’ Named Film of the Year by the London Film Critics Circle

‘Roma’ Named Film of the Year by the London Film Critics Circle
After similar wins in Los Angeles and New York, Alfonson Cuarón’s “Roma” has once again been named the year’s best film, this time by the London Film Critics Circle. It also won Director of the Year laurels, with other major prizes going to “Cold War” (Foreign-Language Film of the Year) and “The Favourite”.

We appear to have reached a familiar awards-season crossroads, dear readers, in which the critics’ awards diverge from those handed out by the guilds. “Roma” is the clear favorite among the former group, while a consensus has yet to emerge among the latter — “Green Book” won big with the PGA last night, but the DGA and SAG have yet to announce their winners. Whatever the case, see the full list of winners from London below:

Film Of The Year

“Roma”

Foreign-language Film Of The Year

“Cold War”

Documentary Of The Year

“Faces Places”

British/Irish
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Who Will Write Our History’ Opens Strong as Oscar Contenders Await Nominations

‘Who Will Write Our History’ Opens Strong as Oscar Contenders Await Nominations
Abramorama release “Who Will Write Our History,” a detailed account of the Warsaw Ghetto during Nazi occupation, showed intense interest in its initial exclusive Manhattan date ahead of special event screenings next weekend. It’s a small release to celebrate; in the pre-Oscar nominations limbo, any signs of life are welcome in the specialized world.

The leading contenders for Oscar nominations grossed about $6 million total this weekend. That compares to about $16 million the weekend prior to the announcement last year. That’s a big drop — but it could also reflect that we’re in a rare Oscar year dominated by major studio films.

Opening

Who Will Write Our History? (Abramorama) – Metacritic: 80; Festivals include: Rome 2018

$12,719 in 1 theater; PTA (per theater average): $12,719

Strong reviews helped propel this documentary centering on massive archives recovered from the Warsaw Ghetto. It played sold-out shows at a 100-seat screen in New York’s Quad Cinema.
See full article at Indiewire »

Gillian Anderson Joins ‘The Crown’ as Margaret Thatcher

Gillian Anderson Joins ‘The Crown’ as Margaret Thatcher
Season three of “The Crown” has yet to premiere, but we have some casting news for season four nevertheless: Gillian Anderson will play Margaret Thatcher on the regal Netflix drama. England’s first female Prime Minister was last seen onscreen when Meryl Streep played her in “The Iron Lady,” winning an Academy Award for her efforts; coincidentally, Olivia Colman — who’s taking over for Claire Foy as the Queen herself in the next two seasons — played her daughter in that film.

Other new additions to the cast include Tobias Menzies as Prince Philip (replacing Matt Smith as the timeline moves forward), Helena Bonham Carter as Princess Margaret (previously played by Vanessa Kirby), and Ben Daniels as Antony Armstrong-Jones. The upcoming batch of episodes is set to begin in 1963 and will feature everything from Beatlemania to England winning the World Cup in 1966, a feat it came close to replicating last year
See full article at Indiewire »

Leslie Jones Says New ‘Ghostbusters’ Film Ignoring Female Reboot Is A “Trump”-Like “Dick Move”

A new “Ghostbusters” film has been announced by director Jason Reitman, son of Ivan Reitman, the original director and producer, and its immediate dismissal of the all-female 2016 reboot (“Ghostbusters”) has already ruffled many feathers online.

Read More: ‘Ghostbusters’ Lives: Jason Reitman To Direct New Film Set In The Original Universe

And comedian Leslie Jones, who played Ghostbuster Patty Tolan in director Paul Feig’s 2016 version of “Ghostbusters,” is not having it.

Continue reading Leslie Jones Says New ‘Ghostbusters’ Film Ignoring Female Reboot Is A “Trump”-Like “Dick Move” at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Glass’ Falls Below Expectations But Wins Weekend Box Office As ‘Dragon Ball’ Is The Real Surprise

Sure, it’s the middle of January, and thus the doldrums of winter at the box office. But in the modern film industry, where tentpoles are launched every month, January 18 is the perfect time to release the trilogy-ending superhero film from a popular director that ends a story that began almost 20 years ago. So, as a surprise to exactly no one, “Glass” debuted this weekend and easily won the domestic box office.

Continue reading ‘Glass’ Falls Below Expectations But Wins Weekend Box Office As ‘Dragon Ball’ Is The Real Surprise at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Remembering Mark Urman, an Independent Film Stalwart Gone Too Soon

Remembering Mark Urman, an Independent Film Stalwart Gone Too Soon
The following remembrance was written by Deborah Davis, Mark Urman’s wife.

From Anatole Litvak’s “Anastasia,” the first movie he saw as a child at a picture palace in the Bronx, to Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” (his choice for this year’s Best Picture), Mark Urman was a man with a boundless passion for cinema. In the course of his nearly 50 years in film, Mark felt blessed to work with some of the greatest luminaries in the business, from Joseph Losey, David Lean, and Bernardo Bertolucci to Roman Polanski, Sydney Lumet, and Julian Schnabel.

He also delighted in encouraging talents as they emerged, including Ryan Gosling, Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, Lynette Howell, Jamie Patricof, Christian Bale, Liv Tyler, Marc Forster, Natasha Richardson, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, Kevin Smith, Cary Fukunaga, Lee Daniels, and Bill Condon.

Mark was born in the Bronx on November 24, 1952, the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Mrs. Maisel’ Remains the Comedy Series to Beat, According to the PGAs

We’re hardly two weeks into 2019, and Amazon Studios’ “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” is already the clear frontrunner in the Emmys race. For the second year in a row, the Producers Guild Awards named the Amazon series as the Danny Thomas Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Comedy. This comes just two weeks after star Rachel Brosnahan scored her second Golden Globes trophy for her performance as Midge Maisel.

The show, held the January 19 at the Beverly Hilton, edged out a handful of up-and-coming comedy series hopefuls, including HBO’s “Barry,” Netflix’s “Glow,” and NBC’s “The Good Place,” all of which could have used the momentum of a PGA win.

Also clear from the “Mrs. Maisel” triumph: While the PGA offers clues as to what the Emmys will look like eight months from now, its eligibility rules make for an eccentric mix. Of the comedies, only “Mrs.
See full article at Indiewire »

Fyre Fest Caterer Raises Thousands After Documentaries Show She Was Scammed, Too

Not many people featured in “Fyre Fraud” and “Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened” acquit themselves well, but a number of exceptions reveal themselves in the two Fyre Festival documentaries released this week. One of them is Pamela Carter, a caterer and restaurant owner who, like many others, was never paid for her work. Now a GoFundMe has been launched on her behalf, and it’s been highly successful: As of this writing, more than $87,000 has been raised.

“As I make this plea it’s hard to believe and embarrassing to admit that I was not paid…I was left in a big hole! My life was changed forever, and my credit was ruined by Fyre Fest. My only resource today is to appeal for help,” writes Carter, whose goal for the fundraiser is $123,000. “There is an old saying that goes ‘bad publicity is better than no publicity’ and
See full article at Indiewire »

What ‘Green Book’ Winning the PGA Award Means for the Most Competitive Oscars In Years

The Beverly Hilton was packed with Academy voters Saturday, as 10 films were presented as candidates for the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer Guild Award. Going in, the conversation was all about what people didn’t know: No one had any idea which film would win. There was Bradley Cooper’s guild frontrunner “A Star Is Born,” the effectively directorless “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and a pack of deserving and inclusive movies including Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma,” Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther,” Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman,” and Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians.”

The movie that answered the question is clearly a popular favorite: Peter Farrelly’s charming ’60s racial drama “Green Book.” While it has stirred controversy since it won the People’s Choice award at the Toronto Film International Film Festival — which often presages the ultimate Best Picture winner — it has delighted audiences ever since.

The 8,000-plus PGA-member producers tend to
See full article at Indiewire »

‘SNL’: How John Mulaney Helped Pete Davidson Return After Suicide Scare

‘SNL’: How John Mulaney Helped Pete Davidson Return After Suicide Scare
It wasn’t entirely surprising that Pete Davidson was on last night’s episode of “Saturday Night Live,” even after posting disturbing messages suggesting he was suicidal last month, but it was surprising to see him flanked by former “SNL” writer John Mulaney. The two appeared as a duo on “Weekend Update,” where Davidson is a regular, to discuss everything from their shared appreciation of Clint Eastwood’s “The Mule” to the fact that Davidson is doing much better now. According to Vanity Fair, Mulaney joining the segment was no coincidence — he’s struggled with his own substance-abuse issues in the past.

“I didn’t realize you guys hung out together,” Colin Jost said after Mulaney showed up. “Yeah, we do, but a lot of times it looks like I’m Pete’s lawyer,” the comedian replied. “But for real, I’ve been spending time with Pete to try to
See full article at Indiewire »

New ‘Shazam!’ TV Trailer Brings Back The Laughs & All New Footage

With every superhero movie recently, both DC and Marvel, the stakes are getting higher, the supervillains are getting eviller, and the destruction is just off the charts. Marvel at least is pulling at our heartstrings, but DC especially seems to be taking themselves way too seriously. Luckily for us, it looks like their dark spell is paused for a minute with the upcoming release of “Shazam!”

Read More: ‘Shazam!’ Teaser Trailer: DC Hopes They’ve Found The Magic Word With Zachary Levi

Directed by David Sandberg, the newest superhero film in the Dceu will have a kid as the main character, though it may not appear so with Zachary Levi playing him.

Continue reading New ‘Shazam!’ TV Trailer Brings Back The Laughs & All New Footage at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
An error has occured. Please try again.

Recently Viewed