Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the mid-to-late 1980s, including ‘Take My Breath Away,’ ‘Let the River Run’

Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the mid-to-late 1980s, including ‘Take My Breath Away,’ ‘Let the River Run’
This article marks Part 18 of the Gold Derby series analyzing 84 years of Best Original Song at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at the timeless tunes recognized in this category, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the winners.

The 1985 Oscar nominees in Best Original Song were:

“The Power of Love” from “Back to the Future

“Surprise, Surprise” from “A Chorus Line

“Miss Celie’s Blues (Sister)” from “The Color Purple

“Say You, Say Me” from “White Nights

Separate Lives” from “White Nights

Won: “Say You, Say Me” from “White Nights

Should’ve won: “Separate Lives” from “White Nights

If 1984 is a merely frustrating year of Best Original Song at the Oscars – given the lack of “Purple Rain” love and Stevie Wonder having defeated four marvelous songs with a decidedly inferior track – 1985 is a flat-out aggravating affair, a year featuring not one or two but five ho-hom pieces,
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Pick of the Flicks Podcast #20 – Santa Claus trainer James Lovell talks Miracle on 34th Street

On The Pick of the Flicks Podcast, a different guest drops in every week to chat about their favourite film. This week, in a special Christmas episode, Santa Claus instructor James Lovell pops by to talk about both movie versions of Miracle on 34th Street…

This week, as we celebrate Christmas, my guest is James Lovell. James is the director of the Ministry of Fun Santa School, responsible for training Santa Claus performers. His choice of favourite Christmas film was Miracle on 34th Street – both the 1947 and 1994 versions. In one, Edmund Gwenn won an Oscar for his sensitive portrayal of the man in red while, in the other, Richard Attenborough became the definitive Father Christmas for an entire generation of kids.

See Also: Listen to last week’s podcast with YouTuber and author Luke Owen on The Transformers: The Movie

If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe on iTunes/Apple Podcasts,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Santa Clauses – ranked!

Ten of the best Hollywood Kris Kringles, from Jim Broadbent (twice) and Billy Bob Thornton to Richard Attenborough and Gene Hackman

For the veteran supporting actor – who would go on to play a certain big Lebowski – this must have seemed like a welcome headlining role, even if the plot revolves round Dudley Moore’s wide-eyed elf being seduced by capitalism. Still, Huddleston brings bags of earthy jollity.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

"The Coolest Guy Movie Ever: Return To The Scene Of 'The Great Escape'": Interview With Joe Amodei, President & CEO Of Virgil Films

  • CinemaRetro
Virgil Films has released the remarkable documentary "The Coolest Guy Movie Ever", a unique look at the 1963 WWII classic "The Great Escape". The film cemented Steve McQueen as a newly-minted superstar of the big screen and featured one of the all-time great casts: James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, David McCallum, Donald Pleasence, James Donald among them. United Artists originally intended the movie to be shot in Hollywood but director John Sturges argued that it would only be convincing if shot on location in Germany. "The Coolest Guy Movie Ever" visits those locations and presents how they look today. In some cases, the iconic locations have changed considerably while others remain instantly recognizable. The documentary was conceived, directed, photographed and edited by Christophe Espenan, a devoted fan of the film. Espenan and a team of dedicated assistants and enthusiasts of the movie painstakingly tracked down even the most minor locations.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

William Goldman dies by Jennie Kermode - 2018-11-16 16:25:23

William Goldman (centre) with Richard Attenborough and Joe Levine Photo: Bert Verhoeff/Anefo

William Goldman, the screenwriter behind such celebrated works as The Princess Bride, All The President's Men and Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid has died at the age of 87. His health had been poor for some time.

Also an author and playwright, with some of his work adapted for the screen by others, the Chicago-born Columbia graduate broke through as a screenwriter with Harper in 1966. He went on to create memorable adaptations of his own novel Marathon Man and Ira Levin's The Stepford Wives. His later work includes Stephen King adaptations Misery, Hearts In Atlantis and Dreamcatcher. He also worked as a script doctor on such films as Indecent Proposal, Twins and Last Action Hero.

Goldman died at home from pneumonia and complications of colon cancer. He is survived by daughters Jenny and Susanna....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Diane Lane: ‘It’s a relief to be the protagonist instead of the girlfriend’

After more than 40 years in the spotlight, the actor is about to be more prominent than ever, starring in the final season of House of Cards

After more than 40 years as an actor, Diane Lane is thankful for one thing: her scripts no longer routinely include the line: “He’ll kill us if he finds us!” At one point in her career, she laughs, three of her characters were called on to say just that. “I don’t ever want to say that again, because it’s always coming from this ‘clandestine-affair woman’.”

That’s just one of the female archetypes Lane has played among more than 70 roles to date, which have taken in films for directors such as Francis Ford Coppola and Richard Attenborough. She played angsty teens in The Outsiders and Rumble Fish, before graduating to action-star sidekicks in Judge Dredd and Murder at 1600, big-star love interests in The Perfect Storm and Hardball,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Diane Lane: ‘It’s a relief to be the protagonist instead of the girlfriend’

After more than 40 years in the spotlight, the actor is about to be more prominent than ever, starring in the final season of House of Cards

After more than 40 years as an actor, Diane Lane is thankful for one thing: her scripts no longer routinely include the line: “He’ll kill us if he finds us!” At one point in her career, she laughs, three of her characters were called on to say just that. “I don’t ever want to say that again, because it’s always coming from this ‘clandestine-affair woman’.”

That’s just one of the female archetypes Lane has played among more than 70 roles to date, which have taken in films for directors such as Francis Ford Coppola and Richard Attenborough. She played angsty teens in The Outsiders and Rumble Fish, before graduating to action-star sidekicks in Judge Dredd and Murder at 1600, big-star love interests in The Perfect Storm and Hardball,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Dennis Norden Dies: Veteran UK TV Host & Comedy Writer Was 96

  • Deadline
Dennis Norden Dies: Veteran UK TV Host & Comedy Writer Was 96
Veteran TV host and comedy writer Denis Norden has died aged 96, his family has said.

Best known as the frontman for long-running ITV blooper show It’ll Be Alright On The Night, Norden died on Wednesday morning following a spell in a London hospital. He hosted the hit ITV series from 1977 until his retirement aged 84 in 2006.

After an early career working in cinemas, Norden began scriptwriting during the Second World War. He wrote his first script for the BBC at the age of 19 and from 1948 to 1959, he co-wrote the successful BBC Radio comedy programme Take It From Here with comic Frank Muir with whom he was a regular collaborator.

Norden also wrote a number of film scrips in the 1960s and 70s, including Paramount comedy The Bliss Of Mrs Blossom, starring Shirley MacLaine and Richard Attenborough, United Artists rom-com Buona Sera, Mrs Campbell (which scored a WGA nomination) with Gina Lollobrigida,
See full article at Deadline »

Saying Hello and Goodbye to Jurassic Park: The Ride

  • MovieWeb
Saying Hello and Goodbye to Jurassic Park: The Ride
If anyone ever talks to me about movies for more than ten minutes, it's highly likely that I will bring up Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park. It's my absolute favorite movie and thus, Universal's Jurassic Park: The Ride means a great deal to me, which is why it's very sad to see the attraction leave the park. But my relationship to the ride is one more akin to Captain Ahab and his elusive white whale. In the 22 years that the ride had been open, I had never had the opportunity to go to Universal Studios to check it out myself. But I obsessed over it for more than two decades. With the ride closing for good, I finally took my chance to say both hello and goodbye to it on the attraction's final weekend.

Upon hearing the news that Universal Studios would be closing Jurassic Park: The Ride following Labor Day weekend,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Jurassic Park Returns to Theaters This Fall for 3 Days Only

Jurassic Park Returns to Theaters This Fall for 3 Days Only
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom arrived in theaters this summer and was a giant blockbuster hit. But it still can't quite compete with the original classic Jurassic Park, directed by Steven Spielberg and released in 1994. Younger fans who've never gotten to experience that first exciting sci-fi dino thriller the way it was meant to be seen are in luck, as Jurassic Park is stomping its way back to a theater near you very soon.

Few films have excited a generation of moviegoers as much as Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park. In honor of its 25th anniversary, Fathom Events and Universal Pictures are bringing Spielberg's revolutionary 1993 action-adventure film back to movie theaters nationwide this September.

Jurassic Park will play in more than 500 movie theaters across the U.S. on Sunday, September 16, at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. (local time); and at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 18, and Wednesday, September 19. Tickets
See full article at MovieWeb »

Ronnie Taylor Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Gandhi’ Cinematographer Was 93

Ronnie Taylor Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Gandhi’ Cinematographer Was 93
Ronnie Taylor, the British cinematographer who shared an Oscar for Richard Attenborough’s Gandhi and whose collaborations with that director and Ken Russell produced some of the most memorable films of their eras, died August 3 in Ibiza. He was 93 and had suffered a stroke months earlier.

His death was announced by The British Society of Cinematographers, where Taylor served as president from 1990-1992.

In addition to Gandhi, Taylor’s work with Attenborough includes 1985’s A Chorus Line and 1987’s Cry Freedom. Earlier, Taylor had served as camera operator on Attenborough’s Oh! What a Lovely War in 1969 and the 1972 Churchill biopic Young Winston starring Simon Ward in the title role.

As cinematographer, Taylor’s trio of Russell collaborations are The Devils (1971), Savage Messiah (1972) and Tommy (1975).

According to the Bsc, Taylor began his film career as a clapper boy on 1942’s The Young Mr. Pitt, and by the early 1960s his
See full article at Deadline »

Ronnie Taylor, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer on 'Gandhi,' Dies at 93

Ronnie Taylor, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer on 'Gandhi,' Dies at 93
Ronnie Taylor, the British cinematographer who twice stepped in to save Richard Attenborough's towering 1982 production of Gandhi, then shared an Academy Award for his efforts, has died. He was 93.

Taylor died Aug. 3 in Ibiza off the coast of Spain after suffering a stroke months earlier, a spokesperson from the British Society of Cinematographers told The Hollywood Reporter. He was president of the organization from 1990-92.

Taylor also lensed Attenborough's A Chorus Line (1985) and the apartheid drama Cry Freedom (1987), and collaborated on three films with director Ken Russell, including the rock opera Tommy (1975), on which he came aboard ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

The Coolest Guy Movie Ever: Revisit The Great Escape With New Trailer

Few World War II adventure films are as, well, great, as John Sturges’ 1963 film The Great Escape. Based on true events the film had an unrivaled ensemble cast including Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, David McCallum and Donald Pleasence. In August Virgil Films will release The Coolest Guy Movie Ever, a documentary about the making of The Great Escape. Seeing as David McCallum, William Russell and John Leyton are the last surviving stars of the film Espenan had to assemble a team of cameramen, historians, film buffs, and local experts to find the exact locations where the film was made. It promises to be a fascinating trip back into film history for fans of The Great...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Michael Douglas movies: 14 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Wall Street,’ ‘Fatal Attraction,’ ‘Ant-Man’

  • Gold Derby
Michael Douglas movies: 14 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Wall Street,’ ‘Fatal Attraction,’ ‘Ant-Man’
Academy Award winner Michael Douglas has had a career of almost 50 years in feature films, beginning with his first credited performance in 1969’s “Hail, Hero!” and returning to the screen this month in “Ant-Man and the Wasp.” It is remarkable that after such a lengthy career, Douglas has found a new generation of fans, now that he has become part of the Marvel universe.

In his distinguished career, Douglas has been nominated for two Oscars and won both of them — as producer of the 1975 Best Picture winner “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and as Best Actor for 1987’s “Wall Street.” For his film work, he has also been nominated for nine Golden Globe Awards, winning three — two for producing “Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Romancing the Stone” and one for his performance in “Wall Street.” And as a member of the cast of 2000’s “Traffic,” Douglas won a Screen
See full article at Gold Derby »

A Matter of Life and Death

The wonder movie of 1946 sees the Archers infusing the ‘Film Blanc’ fantasy with amazing images and powerful emotions. Imagination and resourcefulness accomplishes miracles on a Stairway to Heaven, with visual effects never bettered in the pre-cgi era. Michael Powell’s command of the screen overpowers a soon-obsoleted theme about U.S.- British relations.

A Matter of Life and Death

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 939

1946 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 104 min. / Stairway to Heaven / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date July 26, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: David Niven, Kim Hunter, Marius Goring, Roger Livesey, Robert Coote, Kathleen Byron, Richard Attenborough, Bonar Colleano, Joan Maude.

Cinematography: Jack Cardiff

Film Editor: Reginald Mills

Production Design: Alfred Junge

Original Music: Allan Gray

Written, Produced and Directed by Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger came into their own making wartime movies, most of which steered far clear of the accepted definition of propaganda. After their Anglo-Dutch
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Sanju Movie Review

Biopics make subjects immortal by placing the story behind the story in focus on camera. However, biopics are not new to Bollywood even if they are currently fashionable. In the past they have been made about prime ministers, good and bad, and the great patriots of India giving us freedom, especially from the British Raj. Thus, they have been about people being downtrodden but fighting back by joining together under their common cause to in their own way deliver a punch to oppression.

What has changed in recent years is the nature of the biopic going from the martyrs of the nation to more everyday heroes. Instead of Subhash Chandra Bose, we now have Soorma. Instead of Gandhi or Nehru we now get Bhaag Milka Bhaag and Ms Dhoni: The Untold Story. Still these characters have stories of loss and oppression, but they are less about things that define a
See full article at Bollyspice »

A 'Jurassic Park' Refresher Course Before 'Fallen Kingdom'

A 'Jurassic Park' Refresher Course Before 'Fallen Kingdom'
It's time to return to the world of Jurassic Park.

This weekend's Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is the fifth film in the series based on Michael Crichton's novel that was first brought to the big screen 25 years ago with Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park. Over those years, some of its key plot details may have become hazy. That's why there's this handy guide to prepare you for your journey back to Isla Nublar.

Audiences first walked with the dinosaurs in 1993's Jurassic Park, which saw wealthy industrialist John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) and his bioengineering company ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’: Meet the Year’s Most Overqualified Supporting Cast

‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’: Meet the Year’s Most Overqualified Supporting Cast
[Note: Some light spoilers for “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” below.]

Yes, the dinosaurs are back. So are human leads Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard) and Owen (Chris Pratt). Even the battered island of Isla Nubar is still standing (sort of). But as J.A. Bayona’s “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” unfolds, the second film in the second trilogy about dinos run amok adds in a slew of new supporting characters, all the better to populate a fast-expanding franchise.

But these “Jurassic” newbies aren’t a bunch of random additions to the genetically modified series, but a compelling batch of established and rising stars, amounting to what just might be the most overqualified supporting cast of any of this summer’s blockbusters. When James Cromwell is billed sixth in a cast, you’ve got some deep talent. Add Ted Levine disappearing into a nutty turn as an exceedingly stupid mercenary, and you know there’s been some careful
See full article at Indiewire »

'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Review: Welcome to Steaming Dino Poop

'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Review: Welcome to Steaming Dino Poop
Is it enough for a blockbuster to just trot out computer-generated dinos and let the audience munch popcorn while the beasties chomp down on humans? That depends on who you're asking. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is practically guaranteed be a surefire box-office monster. But couldn't it also be good or decent or just not so empty and soulless? Three years ago, the franchise revival Jurassic World traded on our affection for the marvels that Steven Spielberg achieved with 1993's Jurassic Park. But this sequel has the perfunctory vibe that comes
See full article at Rolling Stone »

King of Hearts review – boisterously Rabelaisian anti-war satire

Set during the first world war, Philippe de Broca’s drama imagines a French town booby-trapped by fleeing German forces

Three years before Richard Attenborough’s movie version of Oh! What a Lovely War there was this anti-war satire, set in 1918, now on rerelease – Philippe de Broca’s King of Hearts. Regarded by many, including its director, as a classic, it nonetheless flopped hard at the box office. Watching it again now, I find myself not quite able to hail it as a masterpiece, more of an engaging and contrived oddity – like a U-certificate Marat/Sade – exoticised by the spectacle of non-English-speaking actors dubbed in order to play Scottish soldiers.

Just before the end of the first world war, the German forces retreat from a French town but booby-trap it with a bomb timed to go off at midnight. The inhabitants flee in panic and the patients of a local
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed